about borderline personality part2
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about borderline personality part2

This is a discussion on about borderline personality part2 within the Personality Disorders forums, part of the Mental and Physical Health category; No one knows exactly what causes BPD, but the familiar nature-nurture combination of genetic and environmental misfortune is the likely ...

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Old 04-28-09, 02:23 PM   #1
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No one knows exactly what causes BPD, but the familiar nature-nurture combination of genetic and environmental misfortune is the likely culprit. Linehan has found that some borderline individuals come from homes where they were abused, some from stifling families in which children were told to go to their room if they had to cry, and some from normal families that buckled under the stress of an economic or health-care crisis and failed to provide kids with adequate validation and emotional coaching. "The child does not learn how to understand, label, regulate or tolerate emotional responses, and instead learns to oscillate between emotional inhibition and extreme emotional lability," Linehan and her colleagues write in a paper to be published in a leading journal, Psychological Bulletin.
Those with borderline disorder usually appear as criminals in the media. In the past decade, hundreds of stories in major newspapers have recounted violent crimes committed by those said to have the disorder. A typical example from last year was the lurid tale of an Ontario man labeled borderline who used a screwdriver to gouge out his wife's right eye. (She lived; he got 14 years."
There are several theories about why the number of borderline diagnoses may be rising. A parsimonious explanation is that because of advances in treating common mood problems like short-term depression, more health-care resources are available to identify difficult disorders like BPD. Another explanation is hopeful: BPD treatment has improved dramatically in the past few years. Until recently, a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder was seen as a "death sentence," as Dr. Kenneth Silk of the University of Michigan wrote in the April 2008 issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry. Clinicians often avoided naming the illness and instead told patients they had a less stigmatizing disorder.
Therapeutic advances have changed the landscape. Since 1991, as Dr. Joel Paris points out in his 2008 book, Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder, researchers have conducted at least 17 randomized trials of various psychotherapies for borderline illness, and most have shown encouraging results. According to a big Harvard project called the McLean Study of Adult Development, 88% of those who received a diagnosis of BPD no longer meet the criteria for the disorder a decade after starting treatment. Most show some improvement within a year.
Still, the rise in borderline diagnoses may illustrate something about our particular historical moment. Culturally speaking, every age has its signature crack-up illness. In the 1950s, an era of postwar trauma, nuclear fear and the self-medicating three-martini lunch, it was anxiety. (In 1956, 1 in 50 Americans was regularly taking mood-numbing tranquilizers like Miltown a chemical blunderbuss compared with today's sleep aids and antianxiety meds.) During the '60s and '70s, an age of suspicion and Watergate, schizophrenics of the One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest sort captured the imagination mental patients as paranoid heroes. Many mental institutions were emptied at the end of this period. In the '90s, after serotonin-manipulating drugs were released and so many patients were listening to Prozac, thousands of news stories suggested, incorrectly, that the problem of chronic depression had been finally solved. Whether driven by scary headlines, popular movies or just pharmacological faddishness, the decade and the disorder do tend to find each other.

Eventually, borderlines became pretty much anything a therapist said they were. Says Dr. Kenneth Duckworth, medical director of the National Alliance on Mental Illness: "If you hated the patient if the patient was pissing you off you would bandy this term about: 'Oh, you're just a borderline.' It was a diagnosis that was a wastebasket of hostility."
It was Linehan who changed all that. In the early 1990s, she became the first researcher to conduct a randomized study on the treatment of borderline personality disorder. The trial which showed that a treatment she created called "dialectical behavior therapy" significantly reduced borderlines' tendency to hurt themselves as well as the number of days they spent as inpatients astonished a field that had come to see borderlines as hopeless.
Dialectical behavior therapy is so named because at its heart lies the requirement that both patients and therapists find synthesis in various contradictions, or dialectics. For instance, therapists must accept patients just as they are (angry, confrontational, hurting) within the context of trying to teach them how to change. Patients must end the borderline propensity for black-and-white thinking, while realizing that some behaviors are right and some are simply wrong. "The patient's first dilemma," Linehan wrote in her 558-page masterwork, 1993's Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder, "has to do with whom to blame for her predicament. Is she evil, the cause of her own troubles? Or, are other people in the environment or fate to blame? ... Is the patient really vulnerable and unable to control her own behavior ...? Or is she bad, able to control her reactions but unwilling to do so ...? What the borderline individual seems unable to do is to hold both of these contradictory positions in mind."
Linehan's achievement was to realize that borderlines are, in fact, on the border between various dualities dualities that they have to learn to accept and reconcile in order to change their lives. That's easy to say but seems impossible to do until you see it work.
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Old 04-28-09, 09:12 PM   #2
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I didnt really read your full post, but i read up on bpd. i used to think i had it and its still possible. i got with a girl who had BPD and she scared me (no offense to BPD victims), but she just said alot of weird stuff then cried in my car the whole time. She would lie and such and i didnt know how else to deal with it, but to avoid it because i was extremly freaked out.

i didnt know she had bpd until later and i still dont know cuase like you said its pretty hard to diagnose. i feel bad for the girl, but i just couldnt deal with something like that.

I sympasize with the many sufferers though. i have some of the symptons myself, but surely not as severe.
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Old 04-28-09, 11:03 PM   #3
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i know... its pretty scary.. specially because its so hard to diagnose,and there is not direct treatment...
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Old 04-29-09, 12:27 AM   #4
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is it possible to go through your life without ever being diagnosed? What I mean is bpd is new in the sense that generations before have never even fucking heard of bpd and they went through their lives with it and had families and raised kids without treatment, therapy or prescribed medication. I'm starting to wonder when I read the DSM IV which outlines all the personality disorders that you can possibly imagine, the one thing it doesn't describe is personality order - or normalcy and I would love to see any literature which outlines or comes close to definining that for my benefit so I can say 'hey! wtf! that's me! I better fuck off to the doctor now and get diagnosed quick!'

Don't mind me. I'm trying to have a sense of humour in a world gone awry.
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Old 05-04-09, 07:43 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Delta40 View Post
is it possible to go through your life without ever being diagnosed? What I mean is bpd is new in the sense that generations before have never even fucking heard of bpd and they went through their lives with it and had families and raised kids without treatment, therapy or prescribed medication. I'm starting to wonder when I read the DSM IV which outlines all the personality disorders that you can possibly imagine, the one thing it doesn't describe is personality order - or normalcy and I would love to see any literature which outlines or comes close to definining that for my benefit so I can say 'hey! wtf! that's me! I better fuck off to the doctor now and get diagnosed quick!'

lol! well, i know what you mean!.. but still imagine feeling so shitty in many different ways everytime??
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Old 05-04-09, 11:11 PM   #6
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i've been diagnosed with this, and its horrible, but im glad to have a name to this instead of thinking i was just out of my mind crazy lol. i think the worst part is the severe mood swings and being unable to maintain any kind of relationship :( people don't understand sometimes what its like to suddenly be feeling a strong emotion, many times without a specific cause. i've done lots of things in these random emotional states of mind that later make me say "omg i can't believe i did that!". i'm a very calm and gentle person,and once i slapped my own mother in her face (hard) and not even for a real reason. we weren't fighting, she just did something i didn't like and i in a crazy rage at that point. i couldn't control it, and still can't believe it was me that did that. have this disorder also seems to make you more sensitive to the slightest things. one tiny thing could happen and suddenly your crying or screaming or numb. it's a lot more traumatic and interfering with life than many realize i think :/
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Old 05-04-09, 11:22 PM   #7
 
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is it possible to go through your life without ever being diagnosed? What I mean is bpd is new in the sense that generations before have never even fucking heard of bpd and they went through their lives with it and had families and raised kids without treatment, therapy or prescribed medication. I'm starting to wonder when I read the DSM IV which outlines all the personality disorders that you can possibly imagine, the one thing it doesn't describe is personality order - or normalcy and I would love to see any literature which outlines or comes close to definining that for my benefit so I can say 'hey! wtf! that's me! I better fuck off to the doctor now and get diagnosed quick!'

Don't mind me. I'm trying to have a sense of humour in a world gone awry.
I'm sure it's possible, Delta. I was diagnosed with bpd back in the mid-80's and I really didn't understand the diagnose much myself even when explained.

Before I was diagnosed with bpd, I had a friend who had bpd and she was just plain crazy in my mind. One minute, she was caring and loving and the next she was threatening to kill you and then the next minute she was threatening to kill herself. She scared the [email protected] out of me because sometimes she'd get this crazed gleam in her eyes and her behavior was so totally uncontrolled and wild and out there. I thought she was a stark raving loonie tunes until years later I was diagnosed with the same thing and notice some of my own behavior being pretty out there. It's not easy living with bpd. In fact, it's pure hell because you go from one extreme to the next and your thinking is all over the place. I should also state that with my bpd, I'm also diagnosed with bipolar mixed.

This disease is not something I'd wish on anyone because I hate feeling the way I do. I know I'm not normal. I wish I could be but I'm not and may never be. Therapy and medications help but diseases like bpd and bipolar will always be a part of my life. After going thru my own personal hell with these diseases, now I feel bad about what I thought of this other girl. She couldn't help it. She wasn't in therapy and she wasn't on meds but she knew what she had, why she didn't seek further help I don't know. But I do know her trigger for the disease was an abusive, domineering mother and mine was sexual, physical, psychological and abandonment issues.
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Old 05-04-09, 11:28 PM   #8
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I know LM I don't disagree with you. My beef atm is there is no definition for normalcy. The DSM has every personality type known to man classifed under disorder bar normality of course and lets face it, in 2009 who the fuck knows what normal is? It isn't possible to get diagnosed with normalcy! I think people expect to have some a disorder of some kind now anyway - that in and of itself is normal! LMAO.
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Old 05-07-09, 01:31 PM   #9
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i agree with delta in the sense that term of "phsycologic" or mental disorders terms have been a bit abused in the past decades. that only makes matters worst for ppl that indeed suffers from a particular disorder,because it has gone overboard so much that lowers the credibilty 0f ppl who truly suffer it.

for instance, take a look at kids in the US, that are diagnosed with ADD, or ADHD. the percentage is stagering in the past 10 yrs or so. this kids are in all kind of meds just because they are a bit more active, creative, and express themselves in different way. Now, i do think there are kids that have a legitimate reason to be on meds, but is not the case for the many ones "diagnosed" ... is the quiker fix for the doctor to explain the odd behavior..

Especially in the US, everything requires meds ..all is traumatic there is a law suit because someone looked me the wrong way,and it traumatize me...idk.. i just think we try to justfy ourselves too much when it comes to whats "socially acceptable" instead of just embracing it and see the up side of it.

ps: im not including the ppl from this forum... please dont get me wrong, i think if you in deed have a problem that needs to be treated with meds and therapy am all for it.. that`s the reason why im here.. but i do think a lot of ppl are getting misdiagnosed outhere !!
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