150 Years Ago Today
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150 Years Ago Today

This is a discussion on 150 Years Ago Today within the News forums, part of the The TTL Community category; The US Civil War began on 12 April 1861 at 4:30 am when confederate forces in Charleston, south Carolina, fired ...

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Old 04-12-11, 09:22 AM   #1
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The US Civil War began on 12 April 1861 at 4:30 am when confederate forces in Charleston, south Carolina, fired on Union forces holding Fort Sumter, which was located in Charleston Harbor. The bombardment lasted 34 hours and resulted in Union evacuation of the Fort. One Union soldier died after the battle while firing a cannon salute as part of the evacuation. One Confederate soldier bled to death after being wounded by a misfiring cannon during the battle.

Although most of the Confederate states had declared their secession from the Union before the Battle of Ft. Sumter, no shots had been fired, the mail continued to be delivered in both directions, as did telegraph messages and rail service. After Sumter was captured, the Union increased its military strength to recapture the fort, so the war continued and expanded.

A moment of silence would be appropriate in rememberance of all who fell in that terrible campaign that would go on for 4 more years.
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Old 04-12-11, 10:03 AM   #2
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I wish more people would read about the war.
Itís a popular misconception that the war was all about slavery.
Slavery was only a small part of it.
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Old 04-12-11, 10:09 AM   #3
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I could into a really long explanation, but I wont now or here...but suffice it to say, I think I was in that war, err at least my spirit was.
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Old 04-12-11, 01:34 PM   #4
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That was a break from my dumb reality, thanks.

When I was a little, we lived in West Virginia and always went to the Battle of Antietam anniversary reenactment on sept 17, I think. There was a field hospital with gruesome amputations happening and cannons and lots of scary stuff. I always text my dad on September 17 to remind him. He was really into civil war history back then.

Actually, I remember being surprised when I first heard about world war II because I had thought all wars were civil wars, that "civil war" was just the word for "war."
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Old 04-12-11, 02:45 PM   #5
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I disagree about the war not being about slavery. The war was about the right of states to leave the union or not, but the single issue that lead to succession was slavery. I'd suggest that anyone who doubts this actually read the documents of succession from the Southern states. They all said they were succeeding to protect their institution of slavery. The event that triggered their succession was the election of a president from the radical abolitionist Republican party who ran on a platform of preventing slavery from expanding west in any of the territories - which was pretty "radical" for the time as it challenged the status quo of the various compromises over the issue. The southern states knew that slavery in their own states depended on new slaves states being added to balance the political power of free states, especially in the Senate.

Lincoln, who was more pragmatic than idealistic, tried to down play the slavery issue in order to prevent border states from succeeding and fought the war initially to preserve the union as it had been, with slavery still legal throughout the south. However, eventually it became clear that there was no way to return to the pre-war status quo and he issued the decree to free the slaves. By the end of the war, thousands of former slaves joined the Union army in order to fight for their freedom. To them it most definately was about slavery.

The Southern states may have seen the union differently and thought that they had the right to leave it at will. However they would have never left it if it wasn't for their own perceived threat to their slavery based societies. Slavery was important enough to their economies that they risked war and their eventual outright destruction in order to preserve it.

Trying to separate slavery from the Civil War is like trying to talk about World War II as if facism and nationalism played only a small role in that.

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