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This is a discussion on Not in the charts... within the Inspirational Music and Movies forums, part of the Inspiration category; Gluck is a true delight and a giant of a composer. I adore this operas,they are all on my shelves ...

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Old 01-27-13, 02:25 PM   #41
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Gluck is a true delight and a giant of a composer. I adore this operas,they are all on my shelves "Armide " ( in the superb Minkowski version ) being my favorite.

Anyway :there is an utterly amazing website ( on a Russian server,hehe ) where you can access tens of thousands of hours of listening ,an archive of Gargantuan size for a tiny fee.( Or some waiting time instead ).
Here is the Minkowski link : Armida, opera, - Christoph Willibald Gluck - free listen online, download mp3 Isn't that Ouverture truly fantastic ??


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Old 01-29-13, 12:48 AM   #42
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Default Gershwin

The grand Master in his last concert playing Gershwin.
Jascha Heifetz-It ain't necessarely so- Gershwin - YouTube
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Old 01-30-13, 01:46 AM   #43
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Default Maryla Jonas

Maryla Jonas plays Chopin Mazurka in C sharp minor Op. 30 No. 4 - YouTube

The pianist Maryla Jonas (b. May 31, 1911, Warsaw, Poland - d. July 3, 1959, New York, New York), pronounced Marie-la, was born in Warsaw, Poland, debuting her pianistic talent at the age of 9. In spite of Jonas's father's misgivings about a career in piano performance, Jonas studied with the Polish pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski-a fellow pupil of Witold Małcużyński and Halina Czerny-Stefanksa—and made her debut with the Warsaw Philharmonic in 1920. Jonas's adult career started in 1926 with a tour of various European capitals starting in Germany. Jonas's touring career proved successful and paved the way for a 13th place finish in the second International Frédéric Chopin Piano Competition in 1932. Alexander Uninsky took first prize in the same competition. In 1933 Jonas won the Beethoven prize of Vienna and following her victory established a successful European-based performance career.

Jonas's success in establishing herself as a European touring pianist was overshadowed in 1939 by the German invasion of Poland. Jonas refused the invitation of a Gestapo agent to move to Berlin and perform in a safer environment. As a result of her refusal to move to Berlin, Jonas was arrested and remained in custody for several weeks. A German officer who had once heard her perform in Germany took pity on her and had her released. The German officer advised Jonas to travel to Berlin and visit the Brazilian Embassy for aid. Jonas took the German officer's advice and traveled to Berlin on foot, walking several hundred miles short of food and without recourse to safe shelter. The distant walk to Berlin is likely to have seriously damaged Jonas's health and may have resulted in her untimely death at the age of 48.

Jonas's connection with the Brazilian embassy in Berlin proved fortuitous for her. The embassy supplied Jonas with false records that made her out to be the wife of the Ambassador's son. Jonas traveled from Berlin to Lisbon and finally settled in the capital of Brazil, Rio de Janeiro. In the year 1940, while residing in Brazil, Jonas suffered a nervous breakdown and lived several months in sanatoriums. When it looked as though Jonas was on the mend, she received the painful news that one of her brothers had been killed. The news of her brother's death was followed by news that her husband and parents had also died. The painful losses Jonas experienced, resulting from the Nazi invasion of Poland, made the prospects of her future as a pianist appear unlikely. Jonas's sister and Artur Rubinstein, another famous Polish pianist, offered their support to Jonas and opened the possibility for her to return to performing and recording piano music. Jonas resumed her pianistic career in New York making her debut at Carnegie Hall in February, 1946
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Old 01-30-13, 08:12 PM   #44
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Default Van Cliburn

The genius of American pianist Van Cliburn can be seen here in the infamous solo cadenza of the 3rd concerto by Rachmaninoff. He plays the much longer and difficult first version which even Horowitz didn't tackle. Interesting is the mesmerizing stillness at 3:30 and beauty of sound he creates after the cadenza,worth watching the whole clip. No wonder he won the Tschaikowsky Competition with this performance and Russia went nuts over him .at the height of the Cold War,but music is above politics.


Van CLIBURN plays RACHMANINOV 3d Concerto VIDEO Moscow 1958 (2-5) - YouTube

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Old 01-30-13, 09:53 PM   #45
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I did not care for heavy handed pounding up until 2:45, but loved everything after that. I especially loved around 4:30...that was amazing. It seems very near impossible.

Thank you for sharing :)

Please forgive the fact that I know very little about music and the terminology. I just enjoy listening to classical, especially piano.

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The genius of American pianist Van Cliburn can be seen here in the infamous solo cadenza of the 3rd concerto by Rachmaninoff. He plays the much longer and difficult first version which even Horowitz didn't tackle. Interesting is the mesmerizing stillness at 3:30 and beauty of sound he creates after the cadenza,worth watching the whole clip. No wonder he won the Tschaikowsky Competition with this performance and Russia went nuts over him .at the height of the Cold War,but music is above politics.


Van CLIBURN plays RACHMANINOV 3d Concerto VIDEO Moscow 1958 (2-5) - YouTube
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Old 01-30-13, 10:03 PM   #46
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Very nice.

I enjoyed the story too.

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Maryla Jonas plays Chopin Mazurka in C sharp minor Op. 30 No. 4 - YouTube

The pianist Maryla Jonas (b. May 31, 1911, Warsaw, Poland - d. July 3, 1959, New York, New York), pronounced Marie-la, was born in Warsaw, Poland, debuting her pianistic talent at the age of 9. In spite of Jonas's father's misgivings about a career in piano performance, Jonas studied with the Polish pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski-a fellow pupil of Witold Małcużyński and Halina Czerny-Stefanksa—and made her debut with the Warsaw Philharmonic in 1920. Jonas's adult career started in 1926 with a tour of various European capitals starting in Germany. Jonas's touring career proved successful and paved the way for a 13th place finish in the second International Frédéric Chopin Piano Competition in 1932. Alexander Uninsky took first prize in the same competition. In 1933 Jonas won the Beethoven prize of Vienna and following her victory established a successful European-based performance career.

Jonas's success in establishing herself as a European touring pianist was overshadowed in 1939 by the German invasion of Poland. Jonas refused the invitation of a Gestapo agent to move to Berlin and perform in a safer environment. As a result of her refusal to move to Berlin, Jonas was arrested and remained in custody for several weeks. A German officer who had once heard her perform in Germany took pity on her and had her released. The German officer advised Jonas to travel to Berlin and visit the Brazilian Embassy for aid. Jonas took the German officer's advice and traveled to Berlin on foot, walking several hundred miles short of food and without recourse to safe shelter. The distant walk to Berlin is likely to have seriously damaged Jonas's health and may have resulted in her untimely death at the age of 48.

Jonas's connection with the Brazilian embassy in Berlin proved fortuitous for her. The embassy supplied Jonas with false records that made her out to be the wife of the Ambassador's son. Jonas traveled from Berlin to Lisbon and finally settled in the capital of Brazil, Rio de Janeiro. In the year 1940, while residing in Brazil, Jonas suffered a nervous breakdown and lived several months in sanatoriums. When it looked as though Jonas was on the mend, she received the painful news that one of her brothers had been killed. The news of her brother's death was followed by news that her husband and parents had also died. The painful losses Jonas experienced, resulting from the Nazi invasion of Poland, made the prospects of her future as a pianist appear unlikely. Jonas's sister and Artur Rubinstein, another famous Polish pianist, offered their support to Jonas and opened the possibility for her to return to performing and recording piano music. Jonas resumed her pianistic career in New York making her debut at Carnegie Hall in February, 1946
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Old 01-30-13, 10:09 PM   #47
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Default Flight of the Bumblebee

I cannot help but smile whenever I see someone play this. It fills me with joy!

Maksim plays Original of Flight of the Bumble Bee - YouTube
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Old 01-30-13, 10:23 PM   #48
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Default Gottschalk

Thank you, Yang Yin.
Here is a piece by Louis Moreau Gottschalk , The Banjo performed by the great Cyprien Katsaris . (sorry for the bad recording ).

LM Gottschalk, The Banjo, Arr C Katsaris, Cyprien Katsaris Piano - YouTube
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Old 01-30-13, 10:33 PM   #49
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Richter Bach The Well-Tempered Clavier Book BWV 846 - 893.wmv & bonus - YouTube

I can't play the piano but I did teach myself how to play this ages ago. I was proud :=]
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Old 01-30-13, 10:40 PM   #50
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Ginastera: Suite de danzas criollas, Op.15 - Christian Badian, Piano - YouTube
Ginastera!!
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