Sketching advice for a beginner
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Sketching advice for a beginner

This is a discussion on Sketching advice for a beginner within the Art Gallery forums, part of the Games and Creativity category; I glanced at a few of the artwork posted and am amazed at the talent. I have been trying to ...

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Old 04-10-14, 05:19 AM   #1
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Default Sketching advice for a beginner

I glanced at a few of the artwork posted and am amazed at the talent. I have been trying to draw an image in my head but I can't get it right. The picture will consist of three people standing in front of each other, each person a different size. The problem is they do not turn out realistically enough, especially their expressions, and that is the part I want to convey the strongest.
I've searched for classes on at bit there are none in my area. I would love some advice on shading and facial expressions or resources concerning them. Thank you
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Old 04-19-14, 11:39 PM   #2
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Can you post what you've done? I wouldn't want to tell you the beginner tips without seeing your drawing. I bet it's better than you think.

For expressions, you can use a mirror and draw your own face, then think about what is the most important patch of light and dark in that face, and how the made up person's face is structured differently than yours. Like younger or female faces often have rounder features, and men are more angular.

Also, I used to want everything I drew to look photorealistic, but that's not the only way to be expressive in art. Ultimately, if you want total photorealism, you can get that easily with a camera. A cartoon is totally acceptable and I've seen cartoons that say more to me emotionally than some realistic portraits.
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Old 04-22-14, 01:28 AM   #3
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e=euphoriafish;1550898] Ultimately, if you want total photorealism, you can get that easily with a camera. [/quote]


Lol its funny that you say that because it's what I tell myself when I'm being overly critical on a drawing. I am a flawed perfectionist though, and that personality trait has become rather dominant lately. As a result in rarely happy with my results
[quot

Two of my attempts at sketching
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Old 04-26-14, 03:53 PM   #4
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Oh I like your drawings! The proportions are good, like the shoulders in relation to the head look right to me. And you didn't overdo the jawline in the first one like I'd be tempted to.

My opinion as a university art student is that you might benefit from drawing from life more, or from magazine images that have a part of your drawing that you're scowling at because it didn't come out right.

If you take a class, you will likely be told that you are outlining features too much, like the eyes in the second one in particular. It's easier to avoid doing this in willow charcoal than it is in pencil, and with a kneadable eraser you can endlessly add or remove dark shading from the paper without wearing it out too much. Also, hair may look like lines but is actually patches of light and dark that you scratch lines into at the edges with pencil or eraser.

A book I found really useful is Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain by Betty Edwards that you can borrow at the library or interlibrary loan if need be. It's a series of exercises to get you out of the habit of drawing symbols and outlining what needs to be seen as a shape of shading rather than a line. Also, it will make your inner perfectionist feel better to see the child art drawings and realize, Hey! I totally don't draw stick figures anymore!

Then once you like what you're copying from the mirror and photos, try collaging photos into a composition that looks sort of like what you're imagining in your head.

Anyway, you're not bad at all and should just keep at it!
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Old 05-04-14, 02:15 AM   #5
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Ok, I know this is a little off topic but you give AMAZING advice. I'm something of a "forum cruiser" and have read thousands of replies and attempts at advice. Most advice is pretty general, blasé and not terribly specific. Your advice was written clearly, easy to understand, personal and it even comes with references. I am in the process of ordering the book you recommended on Amazon (can't use my library, I'm on their 10 most wanted list for overdue fines) and I'm going to look into willow charcoal.
I actually finished one of the drawings and I hope you don't mind that I share it with you.

In retrospect I now see that her pupils are too large, the shading is crudely done and her hair needs more work but strangely, I'm actually fairly pleased with it.
So, in conclusion... Thank you, thank you, thank you, your awesome, thank you thank you thank you

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Old 06-03-14, 02:26 PM   #6
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Thank you for the compliment! I hope the advice helped. It's mostly from class experience and my teachers' advice.

You can actually make your own willow charcoal if you have a willow tree in your yard or a neighbor with a tree who doesn't mind you taking a branch or two and leaving enough to not kill the tree. Then you cut it into pieces and wrap them in aluminum foil and grill them or ask someone to grill them for you on the outside grill so they blacken and then when the fire's out and they completely cool unwrap them. But it's not too expensive at the store either and they also have black pastels and black chalk that you'll find is darker than the black charcoal so you can get a wider range of light and dark shadows working with your fingers or kleenex and a kneadable eraser. If you want really sharp white lines also you can cut the edge on a white plastic eraser to get the edge back when it gets rounded and stubby.
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Old 06-03-14, 02:30 PM   #7
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Your new face sketch is a lot better than the first one you posted! Great job! The spacing between the features looks good to me and you did the hair in smaller strokes for some tone variation instead of just shading the whole hair area the same way.

I hope drawing brings you a lot of happiness and you'll keep doing it. :)
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Old 12-10-16, 08:20 PM   #8
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Very nice on the face pictures. They're looking quite lifelike. No matter how much I've practiced, I've never been able to get mine to look alive. Yes, they can be identifiable as human but as for making them look alive, not much luck there.
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